For India and Pakistan, Cricket Is Never Just a Game

For India and Pakistan, Cricket Is Never Just a Game

The event will be watched by hundreds of millions around the world, on televisions in remote villages, jumbo screens in crowded cities, phones in migrant labor tenements and flickering monitors in the living rooms of a diaspora spread across the world’s time zones.

New York Times

Even here in california, Indians are ready to watch the game on their TVs or iPads or iPhones.

“We need to maintain a cricketing bond,” Ramiz Raja, who leads the Pakistan Cricket Board, said after meeting his Indian counterpart. “Our stance is, ‘The further politics remains from cricket, the better.’”

New York Times

I belong to the camp that thinks, no cricket until all political issues are resolved. The day Indians don’t care about India-Pakistan match, is the day we will be able to solve political issues with Pakistan.

But that ain’t happening soon.

Who Are America’s Billionaires, Anyway?

Who Are America’s Billionaires, Anyway?

Sam Bankman-Fried, 29, is a prime example of a new kind of billionaire. In 2011, during the Occupy Wall Street protests, he was a student at M.I.T., considering becoming a physics professor and interested in effective altruism, a philosophy that supports applying data and evidence to doing the most good for the many.

That led him to trading on Wall Street for a few years after graduation and then into the cryptocurrency field in 2017. He started Alameda Research, a crypto trading entity in California, and in 2018 moved to Hong Kong, where he later launched FTX, a crypto derivatives exchange that offers products unavailable to U.S. traders.

Today he is worth $26.5 billion on paper. He is not a fan of the proposed billionaire tax, which would tax unrealized gains in the value of liquid assets, such as stocks, bonds and cash. For founders whose wealth is tied up in their companies, that could pose a dilemma.

“I think my biggest worry is that, especially when someone’s stock ownership far outstrips their liquid cash, taxing unrealized gains would cause massive forced selling of holdings, constant churn and cause companies to decide not to go public,” Mr. Bankman-Fried said in a statement to The New York Times. “I think this could cause hugely negative collateral damage, significantly reducing the amount of innovation and taxable base in the first place.”

New York Times

2011: Student at MIT
2021: Billionaire. ($26 Billion)

wow!

Converting 450m Indians into smartphone users

Google and Jio seek to convert 450m Indians into smartphone users

Google and Mukesh Ambani’s Jio are hoping to crack one of the world’s largest untapped smartphone markets, launching a device they hope will be cheap enough to convert 450m Indians on “dumb” handsets into smartphone users.

“Jio has been good at two things. One is mega-launches. Secondly, breaking the price [barrier],” said Neha Singh, founder of data provider Tracxn in Bangalore.

Financial Times

Google couldn’t have found a better partner than Jio.

Tesla: Opposite of designed by Committe

Jay Leno: Elon Musk is the reason Tesla is the most valuable car company in the world:

Tesla’s market cap hit $1 trillion earlier this week, sending Musk’s net worth skyrocketing near $300 billion after Hertz announced it will be ordering 100,000 vehicles to build out its electric vehicle rental fleet.

“Can you imagine any of the major automobile manufacturers saying ‘Let’s call this high performance feature ‘Plaid’ like they did in ‘Spaceballs’ as a joke?‘” Leno says, referring to Tesla’s most high-powered vehicle. “You’d be fired or thrown out of the office. But when you own the company? Well, my car says ‘Plaid’ on the back of it.” (In the 1987 movie “Spaceballs,” spacecraft accelerate from light- to ridiculous- then ludicrous-speed and finally into “plaid.”)

Musk’s ability to influence design choices, such as the new steering wheel shape on its Model S cars, allow Tesla to stand out from the competition “because it’s one person’s idea of what it should be.”

Musk’s ability to influence design choices, such as the new steering wheel shape on its Model S cars, allow Tesla to stand out from the competition “because it’s one person’s idea of what it should be.”

CNBC

100% agree with Leno.

Bus Rulaye Ga Kya

Apple’s record quarter came “despite larger than expected supply constraints,” said Apple CEO Tim Cook. “We estimate these constraints had around a $6 billion revenue dollar impact, driven primarily by industry-wide silicon shortages and COVID related manufacturing disruptions.”

Six. Billion. Dollars. That’s cash that Apple’s customers slapped on the table in the last three months, saying “shut up and take my money“… and were denied. Because Apple just didn’t have the products available to sell. That record $83.4 billion quarter should’ve been a record $89.4 billion quarter, but for all the woes in the international supply chain. And here’s the scarier part: it’s going to get worse before it gets better.

Mac World

This is ridiculuous.

People wanted to give 6 Billion Dollars to Apple that it could not take.
There is no Laxmi Pooja done at Apple Park but Goddess Laxmi certainly has her full blessings on this company.

Just amazing.

Indians with money buying iPhones

Apple CEO Tim Cook earlier on Friday announced that the company doubled its business in India, but does this indicate that iPhones have now become favourites in the country? It actually is because just hours later, we have numbers from a market research firm that says Apple now has a 44 per cent share in the premium phone market.

India Today

On Clubhouse app, I keep asking those who live in India that how many people you see with iPhones. And mostly the reply is its all Android. Unless I meet someone who lives in affluent neighborhoods of Mumbai and Delhi, where the reply is, “all my friends and family have iPhones”

I went to a high end night club in Pune and there were 500 people on dance floor and instead of enjoying the music and my beer, I like a nerd was counting how many people on dance floor have iPhons. around 30% had iPhones.

So iPhone Vs Android is not a feature issue. It’s a money issue. As Indian economy grows and Indians become rich, it is clear iPhones will sell more. I don’t see it any other way.